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Programs : Brochure

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  • Locations: Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania;
  • Program Terms: Fall, Spring
  • Homepage: Click to visit
  • Restrictions: Duke applicants only
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Click here for a definition of this term Open to Non-Duke Students: No Click here for a definition of this term Language of Instruction: English, Swahili
Click here for a definition of this term Housing Options: Campsites, Guesthouses, Homestay, Hotel Click here for a definition of this term Program Advisor: Abby Hall Grubbs
Minimum Class Level: Sophomore Click here for a definition of this term Minimum GPA: 2.5
Click here for a definition of this term Course Load: 16 credits/semester Click here for a definition of this term Additional Program Prerequisites: Previous college-level coursework in environmental studies, biology, ecology or related field
Click here for a definition of this term Language Requirement: None Click here for a definition of this term Areas of Study: African and African American Studies, Biology, Earth and Ocean Sciences, Environmental Science and Policy, International Comparative Studies, Public Policy, Social Sciences, Sociology
Duke Administered Program?: No
Program Description:

Please note that the Duke Study  Abroad Fee will be charged to students enrolled in this program. For more information about the fee, please see http://globaled.duke.edu/finances/study-abroad-fee.

Examine issues of natural resource management and poverty in this densely populated archipelago of more than 50 islands. Once the thriving hub of the East African caravan trade, Zanzibar today depends on natural resources for its very survival. Yet basic economic activities threaten fragile local ecosystems like coastal forests and coral reefs, and vulnerable fauna like flying foxes and whale sharks. Participants explore conservation practice through dialogue with ecologists, policymakers, and communities struggling to balance livelihoods with sustainability in a resource-poor setting.

Based in Zanzibar's Stone Town at the Institute of Marine Science, the program includes excursions throughout the Zanzibar and Mafia archipelagos and along the mainland coast. Lectures and visits to protected areas highlight the complex dynamics of local ecosystems. Additional excursions challenge students to reframe notions of sustainability and "overpopulation" in light of the factors driving environmental degradation.